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Government organizations and institutions have similar requirements and goals regarding their IT infrastructure as commercial enterprises: it must be flexible enough to adapt to the changing needs of the organization, easy to maintain and monitor, scalable to meet the changing workload requirements, highly available and resistent to errors, and of course secure to protect the various sensitive data such organizations must process. In addition, they must meet the requirements of various national and state-level regulations, like the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP), the Department of Defense (DoD) Cloud Computing Security Requirements Guide (SRG), the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA), and other legislation.
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In today’s post, we’ll be discussing multi-datacenter Vault clusters that span multiple regions. Most enterprises follow different replication strategies to provide scalable and highly-available services. One common replication/disaster recovery strategy for distributed applications is to have a hot standby replica of the very same deployment already setup in a secondary data center. When a catastrophic event occurs in the primary data center, all traffic is then redirected to the secondary datacenter.
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One of the main features of the Banzai Cloud Pipeline platform is that it allows enterprises to run cost effective workloads by mixing spot and preemptible instances with regular ones, and without sacrificing overall reliability. First, let’s dig into some of the components that make spot instances so reliable, then we’ll provide an example of a Pipeline control plane installation, submit some workloads and simulate a spot instance termination. Availability in spot-instance clusters EKS or PKE clusters launched with Pipeline can mix in spot and on-demand instances (similarly, GKE can do this with preemptible instances).
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One of the main features of the Banzai Cloud Pipeline platform is that it allows enterprises to run workloads cost effectively by mixing spot or preemptible instances with regular ones, without sacrificing overall reliability. The platform allows enterprises to develop, deploy and scale container-based applications and it leverages best-of-breed cloud components, such as Kubernetes, to create a highly productive yet flexible environment for developers and operation teams alike. tl;dr The Banzai Cloud Pipeline platform switched to a unified, cloud-aware spot instance termination handler to properly drain the cluster node and provide information to the monitoring system if an instance is going to be preempted from a cluster nodepool.
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The Banzai Cloud Cloudinfo service retrieves product and pricing information from cloud providers and exposes it through a RESTful API, and UI. Our Kubernetes based Pipeline platform and Telescopes recommendation engine make use of this information when they advise users on cluster layout and resourcing. Here’s a quick primer of how and why we utilize the Cloudinfo service: Pipeline platform users have the option of launching clusters or deploying applications based only on resource- and SLA-requirements (price, IO, memory, CPU, GPU, etc.
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A few weeks back we released Telescopes, our Kubernetes cluster layout recommender application. That application has evolved quite a bit, and in this post we’ll provide insight into some its new features and recent changes. Cloud cost management series: Overspending in the cloud Managing spot instance clusters on Kubernetes with Hollowtrees Monitor AWS spot instance terminations Diversifying AWS auto-scaling groups Draining Kubernetes nodes tl;dr: We added new features to Telescopes to provide support for blacklisting or whitelisting instance types Recommendation accuracies can now be checked There is now support that allows asking cloud instance types for CPU, memory and network performance.
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When we started to work on our cluster infrastructure recommender, Telescopes, we soon realized how difficult it was to get instance type attributes and pricing information from cloud providers programatically. While EC2, Google Cloud, and Azure all provide some kind of API from which to query this information, in some cases these APIs respond with partially inconsistent data, or their responses are large chunks of JSON files that are very cumbersome to parse.
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Creating Kubernetes clusters in the cloud and deploying (or CI/CDing) applications to those clusters is not always simple. There are a few conventional options, but they are either cloud or distribution specific. While we were working on our open source Pipeline Platform, we needed a solution which covered (here follows an inclusive but not exhaustive list of requirements): provisioning of Kubernetes clusters on all major cloud providers (via REST, UI and CLI) using a unified interface application lifecycle management (on-demand deploy, dependency management, etc) preferably over a REST interface support for multi tenancy, and advanced security scenarios (app to app security with dynamic secrets, standards, multi-auth backends, and more) ability to build cross-cloud or hybrid Kubernetes environments This posts highlights the ease of creating Kubernetes clusters using the Pipeline API on the following providers:
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Cloud cost management series: Overspending in the cloud Managing spot instance clusters on Kubernetes with Hollowtrees Monitor AWS spot instance terminations Diversifying AWS auto-scaling groups Draining Kubernetes nodes A few months ago we posted on this blog about overspending in the cloud. We discussed how difficult it is to keep track of the vast array of instance types and pricing options offered by cloud providers, especially on AWS with spot pricing.
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While we build our open source, cloud agnostic Heroku/Cloud Foundry-like Paas - Pipeline - on top of Kubernetes, we continue to launch lots of clusters on different cloud providers. Most of these clusters are launched on spot or preemptible instances, and managed by Hollowtrees. However, there are many smaller development clusters, control planes, instances and PoCs we launch that are marginally related to, or launched with, Pipeline. Naturally, these have an associated cost that we want to keep tight control over.
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