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More than a month ago, we announced One Eye, the observability tool for Kubernetes. This has been an ongoing project, and we release a new version of it about once per week. We've gathered the features included in those updates here to keep you up to speed. If you are not familiar with One Eye, check out our introductory blog post or browse the official documentation. Who is One Eye for?
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If you've been reading our blog you already know that we're passionate about observability. We are convinced that the key to operating a reliable system is to know what happens where, and the correlated ability to rapidly dissect issues as they emerge. In previous posts we've gone over the base components of our suggested stack, which includes Prometheus, Thanos, Fluentd, Fluentbit, and many others. We've created several tools and operators to ease the management of these components, like the Istio operator, Logging operator, Thanos operator as well as using some other very popular operators, like the Prometheus one.
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Today we are happy to announce a new release of the Banzai Cloud logging operator. It’s been a long time from the first commits till today, and is always nice to look back, learn and reflect on the evolution of the project. The first major release, June 2018 This was the very first release, and among the first operators we made. The operator pattern was pretty new, and the goal of the first logging operator was fairly simple - automate the manual fluent ecosystem configurations we were doing for our customers with the Pipeline platform.
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Istio, and in general the service mesh has changed the way of service to service communication (from dumb pipes and smart endpoints to sidecar-to-sidecar). While this has lots of benefits, it can increase the complexity of troubleshooting microservice to microservice communication. One of the typical places developers are checking when comes to troubleshoot is the Envoy sidecar proxy container's access logs, both on the source and destination side. With the increased number of microservices deployed to distributed environments, this process can be tedious, and it's very inconvenient trying to pair source and destination access log pairs.
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Kubernetes is a highly extensible framework that is built from a bunch of loosely coupled components. This gives a very high level of flexibility, but adds some new challenges to the operation compared to monolithic solutions of similar systems of the past. One of these challenges is observability, especially log collection. This post describes how to collect the logs of Kubernetes components in detail, but does not discuss the collection of application (workload) logs.
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Frequent readers of our blog and users of our hybrid cloud container management platform, Pipeline, will be familiar with the integrated cluster services that come with it. These services are automated end-to-end solutions for centralized logging, federated monitoring, security scans, advanced credential management, autoscaling, registries and lots more (see, for example, automated DNS management for Kubernetes). Providing an automated logging solution, and making sure it works seamlessly across multiple clusters, has always been part of Pipeline.
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On this blog we've already discussed our totally redesigned logging operator, which automates logging pipelines on Kubernetes. Thanks to the tremendous amount of feedback and the numerous contributions we received from our community, we've been able to rethink and redesign that operator from scratch, but the improvements aren't going to stop coming any time soon. Our goal is to continue removing the burden from human operators, and to help them manage the complex architectures of Kubernetes.
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About a year ago we published the first release of our popular logging-operator. The initial version of that operator was designed to fit Pipeline, the Banzai Cloud hybrid cloud container management platform. However, since then, all kinds of people have found it to be an extremely useful tool that helps them manage their logs on Kubernetes. Initially, Fluent ecosystem automation was enough to support the disparate needs of our userbase, but, as the popularity of the logging-operator grew, different setups were put in place by our community that revealed some of its limitations.
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At Banzai Cloud we develop a container management platform that provisions and orchestrates hundreds of Kubernetes clusters across six different cloud providers or hybrid clouds every day. Pipeline makes it easy for users to run applications on Kubernetes, but under the hood there is an insanely complex system, so it's mission critical for us to have realtime information about what's happening inside the platform and have access to historical data to investigate incidents our customers may have had.
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At Banzai Cloud we are passionate about observability, and we expend a great amount of effort to make sure we always know what's happening inside our Kubernetes clusters. All clusters provisioned with Pipeline - our multi- and hybrid-cloud container management platform - are provided with, and rely upon, each of the three pillars of observability: federated monitoring, centralized log collection and traces. In order to automate log collection on Kubernetes, we opensourced a logging-operator built on the Fluent ecosystem.
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